Issue 1 of our print magazine is available to buy now

Issue 1 is available now

The Edit: Quiet Quitting
The Edit

The Edit: Quiet Quitting

Our weekly round up of the best articles, podcasts and videos focusing on purpose in life, work and the world.
16th Sep 2022

The neologism ‘quiet quitting’ is no new concept. It’s commonly defined as employees making the conscious decision to reduce their effort to the bare minimum, taking on no extra work beyond their job description.

With organisations plagued by burnout, this discussion has made its way into the zeitgeist. But is quiet-quitting a genuine way to stand up for yourself in the workplace, or is it, as some suggest, simply masquerading as ‘slacking off’? We offer opposing ideas to this contentious term and more in this week’s #TheEdit.

  • What is quiet quitting? Burnout expert Amelia Nagoski discusses the Tik-Tok originated trend – The Atlantic
  • A Japanese philosophy for the quiet quitting generation. Disillusioned workers and overstretched managers can learn from Japan  – Bloomberg
  • Who’s more likely to do more work? Women of colour bear the brunt of unpaid labour as ‘quiet quitting’ signifies privilege  – The Guardian
  • The term ‘quiet quitting’ is worse than nonsense. Quiet quitting speaks to an unhealthy understanding of the relationship between companies and their staff – The Financial Times
  • Why the fuss over quiet quitting? Bosses’ loud reactions to an anodyne idea are telling – The Economist
  • ‘Earth is now our only shareholder’. The founder of Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard has given away the company to an environmental trust and non-profit – Independent
  • The merging of technology and spirituality. Emerging tech pioneers are respectfully building positive futures inspired by ancient wisdoms – Creative Review
  • Science is sometimes wrong. That’s okay. Why a flawed experiment can be as valuable as a perfect study – The Beautiful Truth

“You will burn and you will burn out; you will be healed and come back again.”

Fyodor Dostoevsky