4th June 2021 0 Comments Purpose

The Edit: Permanent Change

empty office with lots of desk chairs

Post-lockdown represents many positives – freedom, reconnection, variety – but for many, it also brings anxiety and worry. Concerns over infection rates, feelings of social inadequacy and mental health problems are some contributing factors to a seemingly counterintuitive sense of apprehension at the thought of re-entering society. How we can navigate these feelings in order to reconcile with post-lockdown life?

As more offices begin to open and businesses encourage workers back to their desks, some employees are reluctant to relinquish their working-from-home lifestyle. Which new habits in our work and personal lives nurture a more purposeful existence? In short, what will permanently change, and what will be disregarded? 

This is our edit of the global conversation on purpose. 

Life, business and the pursuit of purpose: why it’s so important for companies to have purpose (Forbes). 

Anxious about reentering post-lockdown society? You’re not alone (The New Yorker). 

How a corporate led scheme is offering financial incentives in order to reduce deforestation rates (The Financial Times). 

What makes a workplace toxic, the warning signs to look out for and how to transform a culture of toxicity into a culture of trust (Raconteur). 

Why taking a break often ensures higher levels of productivity (The Economist). 

A new living installation forces audiences to confront climate change head on with this indoor, living forest (Fast Company). 

The importance of prioritising mental health at work, and steps to take in order to do so (The New York Times). 

The workers who are prepared to quit rather than return to the office: is remote work here to stay? (Bloomberg).

Finally, some words to reflect on: 

“Leadership is communicating to people their worth and potential so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves.”

— L. David Marquet, Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders